Mount Fuji

For centuries, artists and writers have attempted to capture the majestic essence of Japan’s best known icon. Shrines pay homage to the mountain, paintings illustrate the beauty through the changing seasons, and explorers tell stories of seeing the sunrise from the summit, but the essence of Mt Fuji remains elusive. 

It is hard to describe how Mount Fuji makes one feel. One shouldn’t despair though, as pilgrims to the mountain have been at a loss for thousands of years as to how to describe the beauty of Mount Fuji, known as Fuji-san to the Japanese.

But we can start with a few interesting facts:

  • Highest mountain in Japan at 3,776 m (12,389ft)
  • One of Japan’s ‘Three Holy Mountains’ along with Mount Tate and Mount Haku
  • UNESCO World Cultural Heritage Site, designated in June 22, 2013
  • Classified as active but with a low risk of eruption. The last recorded eruption was the Hōei eruption which started on December 16, 1707
  • Climbing season begins in July and stretches to the end of August
  • UNESCO recognizes 25 sites of cultural heritage around Mt Fuji, including significant shrines such as Fujisan Hongū Sengen Taisha, and the astounding lakes around the mountain like Lake Kawaguchiko
  • Featured in Japanese art and media for over 1,000 years, from woodblock prints such as the Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji, and poetry, song, theatre, film, manga, anime, and even Japanese pottery, to bank notes and postal stamps

The mountain itself offers a myriad of activities and adventures for all ages and levels of fitness – and even if you are not able to make it right to the summit of the mountain you can still enjoy the lower levels. Even if the weather is not co-operating a visit to the remarkable Mt. Fuji World Heritage Centre will help you to understand why it has been so revered for so many centuries.

A quick drive up to one of the 5th stations, hiking around the crater of Mt Hoei or trekking through the lush undergrowth forest are all easily accessible activities that people of all ages and levels of fitness can enjoy.

Mount Fuji has a snowcap all year round, even in Japan’s surprisingly humid summers, the peak remains peppered with snow and welcomes summiters with bitterly cold winds even in the height of climbing season.

Which begs the question, can one ski or snowboard on Mt Fuji? Well, technically yes you can, at Fujiten resort, there are 4 lifts and 7 courses for those keen to ride in the shadow of the mountain.

The areas around Mt Fuji, such as Fujinomiya City and Gotenba, offer many awe inspiring and adrenaline fueled adventures, as well as relaxation inducing and revitalising activities and the majestic mountain provides a backdrop for unforgettable Shizuoka memories.

Check out some of the following useful links for all of the information that you need to explore Mt Fuji-

Fujinomiya Trail Climbing Organisation – www.fuji-tozan.com

Official Website for Mt Fuji Climbing – www.fujisan223.com

Complete Guide to Mt Fuji – www.fujisan-climb.jp

Fujinomiya Travel Guide – www.travelfujinomiya.com

For links and information on Tour Companies and Operators that provide opportunities to Explore Mt Fuji please check the Mt Fuji Travel website – Mt Fuji Travel

Mount Fuji Things to Do

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